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christmas tree fire

One-Third of Christmas Tree Fires Occur in January: How to Safely Remove Trees From Your Property

As the holiday season comes to a close, it is crucial to be mindful of the potential fire hazards that may have been introduced during the festivities. In both homes and commercial buildings, combustible decorations, festive lights, and Christmas trees can pose a significant risk of fire if not properly maintained or removed. To ensure the safety of your property and loved ones, it is essential to properly dispose of any holiday decorations and take steps to mitigate potential fire hazards.

These additional furnishings and decorations, especially dry and unmaintained Christmas trees and other vegetation, can contribute significantly to the risk of a fire starting and spreading quickly due to the increased fuel load in a space.

In fact, a report from the National Fire Protection Association (NFPA) has found that 33% of US home fires involving Christmas trees happen in January, on average, between 2016 and 2020. These fires resulted in two civilian deaths, 11 civilian injuries and $12m in direct property damage. Dried-out trees can quickly become engulfed in flames, which is why the NFPA advises people to remove their trees promptly after the holiday season. 

How to Safely Remove Christmas Trees From Your Property

To safely remove a tree from a property, follow these steps:

  1. Start by removing all decorations, lights, and ornaments from the tree. 
  2. Inspect each string of lights for damage, throwing out any sets that have loose connections, broken sockets, or cracked or bare wires. Wrap each set of lights and put them in individual plastic bags or wrap them around a piece of cardboard. Store electrical decorations in a dry place away from children and pets where they will not be damaged by water or dampness.
  3. Once all decorations have been removed, cut the tree into smaller pieces if it is too large to be easily carried out of the building.
  4. Carefully lift and carry the tree out of the space, being mindful of doorways, stairs, and other potential hazards.
  5. Dispose of the tree using the local community’s recycling program, if possible. Do not put the tree in the garage or leave it outside, as it can be a fire hazard.

Remember, the US Forest Service advises against burning Christmas trees in a fireplace or wood stove, as they contain flammable turpentine oils which can contribute to creosote buildup and increase the risk of a chimney fire. 

The NFPA recommends using local recycling programs to dispose of trees, and following safe practices for removing decorations and storing them properly.

At Fortis, we believe that proactive measures are key to protecting ourselves and our property from the risk of fires. Learn more about us and what we do, here. 

Interested in learning more? Read the full article from the National Fire Protection Association below.

One-third (33 percent) of Christmas Tree Fires Occur in January, Making Prompt Removal from Homes Critical to Safety

Saying goodbye to your Christmas tree may not be easy, but here’s a compelling reason to remove it as soon as possible: One-third (33 percent) of US home fires involving Christmas trees occur in January, on annual average. 

The longer a natural tree is kept up after Christmas, the more likely it is to dry out; a dried-out tree can become engulfed in flames in a matter of seconds. That’s why NFPA® strongly encourages everyone to remove Christmas trees from their homes promptly after the holiday season.

The latest Christmas tree fires report from NFPA, which reflects annual averages between 2016 and 2020, shows that 160 home structure fires began with Christmas trees, resulting in two civilian deaths, 11 civilian injuries, and $12 million in direct property damage. According to the report, fires that begin with Christmas trees are a very small but notable part of the US fire problem, considering that they are generally in use for a short time each year.

Some Christmas tree fires occur in chimneys or flues, suggesting that people may burn the tree to dispose of it. With these concerns in mind, the US Forest Service offers this caution: “Never burn your Christmas tree in a fireplace or wood stove! Pines, firs and other evergreens have a high content of flammable turpentine oils and burning the tree may contribute to creosote buildup and risk a chimney fire.”

To safely dispose of a Christmas tree, NFPA recommends using the local community’s recycling program, if possible; trees should not be put in the garage or left outside. Also, following are tips for safely removing lighting and decorations and storing them properly to ensure that they’re still in good condition next season:

  • Use the gripping area on the plug when unplugging electrical decorations. Never pull the cord to unplug any device from an electrical outlet, as this can harm the wire and insulation of the cord, increasing the risk of shock or electrical fire.
  • As you pack up light strings, inspect each line for damage, throwing out any sets that have loose connections, broken sockets, or cracked or bare wires.
  • Wrap each set of lights and put them in individual plastic bags or wrap them around a piece of cardboard.
  • Store electrical decorations in a dry place away from children and pets where they will not be damaged by water or dampness.

For more information on home fire safety all winter long, visit “Put a Freeze on Winter Fires,” a winter safety campaign NFPA promotes annually with the US Fire Administration.